Afghanistan: A Personal History

Afghanistan: A Personal History

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It’s hard to talk about Afghanistan’s recent history without talking about a much longer history and tradition. Those of us who are the children of the Mujahideen grew up on stories of our ancestors defeating Alexander the Great and the British Colonial Empire. When I talk to my generation, who grew up when Afghanistan’s current fighting began, about 40 years ago, they talk about those days with a fervor – our families suffered immensely and sacrificed dozens of uncles and relatives to the struggle against Soviet imperialism, but this wasn’t something that happened in isolation.

We’re Afghans – we’ve been killing colonizers since our history began. Not only that, we’ve been taking down their empires with them. The oldest photo we have of our family was stumbled upon by my father who one day found himself looking at his ancestors staring back at him when researching the second Anglo-Afghan war. A proud moment for a man who prides himself on being from a long line of anti imperialists

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In Defence of Black Violence

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Originally Posted in Daily Maverick
By Mbuyiseni Ndlozi I Economic Freedom Fighters
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South Africa
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What do you do when colonial power forms an iron wall with black bodies which you must go through to fight the system? What do you do with house nigger collectives who take up arms to kill the revolutionary, to beat the back community into line? This question is even more crucial today, when our state is run by a black collective which presides over colonial property relations and massacres blacks to protect these colonial properties, than when apartheid managed them directly.
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When Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) commander-in-chief Julius Malema arrived to give an address at the Tshwane University of Technology main campus in the wake of the 2015 Student Representative Council elections, the South African Students’ Congress (Sasco) disrupted the meeting, arguing that the EFF had not booked the venue. In all radical traditions, and in keeping with the spirit of the Freedom Charter, opening the university to radical and diverse views is a significant part of its own transformation. Rather than trying to police access to university premises, Sasco should have, in keeping with radical traditions, listened to what Malema had to say then taken to the stage to robustly argue the points.

Instead, in front of the police and campus security, Sasco members assaulted their way into an EFF public meeting, pushing towards the stage where Malema was about to give his address. Malema said: “Fighters attack.” The result was that ordinary students, as well as EFF members, pushed back and managed to shove Sasco members to the fringes. Relegated to the outskirts of the large crowd, Sasco members then resorted to throwing stones, injuring both students and journalists alike. Still, the police arrested no one.

Many painted this event as “black-on-black violence”, saying Malema’s call for fighters to attack showed a lack of black consciousness. In this piece I will argue that this is a debilitating statement to make to black activists; that they must not defend themselves when attacked by other blacks because they hold a different political view. It denies the right to violent self-defence for activists of decolonisation; in fact they are advised to “run away”.

This argument says that when engaged in the struggle for decolonisation, or the liberation of black people, you must never be violent to other blacks. This is because the objective is to unite blacks, thus, when they attack you run away. This is flawed on many levels, the least of which is that it treats blacks as homogeneous and this goes against all of Steve Biko’s work on the black condition and how we must engage in the politics of decolonisation.

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[Video] 50 Years Ago Today, A Police Encounter Set Off The Watts Rebellion

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[Scroll down to watch “The Fire This Time”]

From BlackPast.Org

By Nichols, Casey (University of Washington, Seattle)

Following World War II, over 500,000 African Americans migrated to West Coast cities in hopes of escaping racism and discrimination. However they found both in the west. For many black Los Angeles, California residents who lived in Watts, their isolation in that community was evidence that racial equality remained a distant goal as they experienced housing, education, employment, and political discrimination. These racial injustices caused Watts’ African American population to explode on August 11, 1965 in what would become the Watts Rebellion.

The rebellion began on August 11th when the Los Angeles Highway Patrol stopped black Watts resident Marquette Frye and his brother, alleging that they were speeding. Back-up was called from the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) as a crowd of African Americans gathered to watch the scene. Since the incident was close to Frye’s home, his mother emerged to find her son resisting arrest. Fearful that his arrest may ignite a riot, one LAPD officer drew his firearm. Catching a glimpse of the gun, Mrs. Frye jumped onto the officer’s back, causing the crowd to begin cheering. Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) officers arrested all three of the Fryes. Enraged by the family’s arrests, Watts’ residents protested as the police cars drove away. Less than an hour later, black Angelenos took to the streets.

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Violence Erupts in Baltimore After Suspected White Supremacists Provoke Peaceful Protesters

Screen Shot 2015-04-27 at 8.48.41 AMOriginally Posted in Melanoidnation

Thousands of protesters took to the streets Saturday in the largest Freddie Gray rally yet, and after hours of peaceful demonstrations, pockets of protesters smashed out police car windows and storefronts after they were provoked by suspected white supremacist sports spectators who were in the area for a baseball game.

Racial tensions  are already high over the death of an innocent,unarmed Black man named Freddie Gray. Gray died April 19 after suffering a fatal spinal injury while in police custody. Authorities have not explained how or when Gray’s spine was injured. Police have said Gray should have received medical attention at the spot where he was arrested before he was put inside a police transport van handcuffed and without a seat belt, a violation of the department’s policy.

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South Africa: Colonial Statue Defaced With Excrement In “Poo Protests”

UKZN: Another statue, same revolution?

Originally Posted in Mail & Guardian

By Victoria John

The Rhodes Must Fall protests at UCT. (Facebook)

Defacing colonial-era statues in the name of transformation is not the revolution – it’s just a symbol of it. But don’t let critics of the student protests that are rocking South Africa persuade you that this part isn’t as crucial to revolutionising racial and cultural representation at universities as the other parts are – the debates, the policy changes and the employment of more black academics. Every protest needs a face. The face of this one is all about defacing those made of stone and as rock-hard as the white privilege belief system standing in the way of real change.

And now there is a new defaced face to add to the face of the movement. It belongs to the statue of King George V at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. On Thursday students discovered that someone had thrown white paint on it and attached a sign to it that reads: “end white privilege” on its statue of King George V. This was the ruler of the United Kingdom for more than twenty years until his death in 1936 – the empire that colonised South Africa.

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‘Black Liberation and the Paradox of Political Engagement’ – A Talk by Frank Wilderson, III

‘Black Liberation and the Paradox of Political Engagement’ – A Talk by Frank Wilderson, III

Screen Shot 2015-03-16 at 6.01.07 PMBlack Student Union (BSU), Critical Anti-Colonial Studies, Faces of African Muslims (FAM), and Islamic Third World Coalition have organized to bring key Afro-Pessimist thinker and anti-Apartheid fighter Dr. Frank Wilderson, III to University of California at Davis.

Date: March 19, 2015
Time: 5 pm
Location: Andrews Conference Room, UCDavis

In this talk, Frank Wilderson will use ideas/themes from a paper he wrote titled “The Black Liberation Army and the Paradox of Political Engagement”. See the abstract of that paper below-

Abstract:
“Assata Shakur’s 1973 prison communiqué is exemplary of the paradox immanent in any recourse to the analogical terrain of the Symbolic for the articulation of a Black political position. The violence constitutive of the Black-qua-Slave voids access to “transindividual objects” of prior spatial (e.g. “land”) or temporal (e.g. “heritage”) plenitude—real or imaginable—that both triangulate intra-Human (non-Black) conflict and fortify their relationality or common subjectivity. Since the narrative structure of political discourse cannot translate gratuitous violence (Real) from “violated” flesh (Imaginary) to its authorized touchstones (Symbolic), it, like the Marxists and postcolonialists who deploy its grammar, are inherently anti-Black.”

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“The Next Day Was Revenge” : Rivalry or Cooperation

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BAI Note:  We would like to suggest that people watch the following video from October 7, 2012 –the 11th anniversary of the US/NATO occupation of aggression against the peoples of Afghanistan– in order to have a better context for this article’s analysis of the past year. BAI would also like to extend an offer of prayer to all who have died from the aggression (whether or not they are dying in battle, or crossing borders, or at the hands of fascists in Europe and North America) :

~”Inna lillahi wa inna ilaihi raji’un انا لله وانا اليه راجعون

Surely we come from Allah; And to him shall we return”~

From Tom Vee : Video from last year’s rally and march:


11th Anniversary of AFG war Poster - Hoodies & Hijabs March

11th Anniversary of AFG war Poster – Hoodies & Hijabs March

“The Next Day Was Revenge” : Rivalry or Cooperation

Oakland, California

Since October 7 of 2012, the 11th anniversary of the US/ NATO occupation  of aggression against the Afghan people (and the 520th year of genocidal occupation of Turtle Island), Oakland, California has seen a major shift in its political make up, as seen manifested in the politics in the streets: Self-Determination and militancy, a revolutionary unity amongst non white-identified peoples, a respect for 3rd Worldism and Islamic values…elements social movements in the US have not seen in decades.

The past year’s successes and failures from voluntary separatism can not be determined just yet. But one major challenge is clear: black and brown people do not have as much money or access to resources as whites. That’s just a fact.

The generic term “POC” or “people of color” is highly problematic, as it easily mis-implies hegemony. In reality, this is a sign of weakness and of declining power among black and brown folks (and of course, others of color) in the US.

This needs to be understood in order for our day-to-day organizing to reflect this truism as well as for us to fully understand what necessitated a voluntary (and for some, temporary) separatism from white radicalism and the politics of academia. We see two tasks in front of us that will not progress at the hand of white people. The first task is the destruction of white hegemony and white supremacy inside and outside “the Movement.” Secondly, and intertwined with the first, we need to strategize, organize, and articulate our collective actions as various tentacles of the same dangerous revolutionary beast connected to a centuries-old struggle for liberation, rather than to act as self-important cliques in a college scene (or a dropped-out-of-life scene). Currently, we don’t have a movement at all: we have a “scene.” This is one of the largest problems and biggest distractions of our time. In fact, it’s an argument in favor of separatism (whether temporary or prolonged)–of checking white supremacy to ensure that more of us are compelled to take action with the confidence that we will struggle against a common enemy, rather than merely struggling to have our perspectives included in the narrative of what goes down–a struggle we’ve been bound to for fucking ever.

Pigs Are Haram

Pigs Are Haram

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