“White Women and the Privilege of Solidarity” – Decolonial Islamic Feminism ( Speech & Video Interview w/ Houria Bouteldja )

Houria Bouteldja is a spokesperson for PIR, a decolonial political party in France called Les Indigenes de la Republique or Indigenous Peoples Party of the Republic.  This is her speech at the 4th International Congress of Islamic Feminism in October 2010 in Madrid, Spain.

This is followed by a video interview done by Tom Vee at the University of California in Berkeley in April 2011. Topics include Islamophobia, decolonial feminism, the privilege of solidarity and BDS (Boycott, Divest, Sanction).

Originally posted by Decolonial Translation Group

Madrid, Spain

Houria Bouteldja

Houria Bouteldja

I would, first of all, like to thank the Junta Islamica Catalana for having organized this colloquium, which is a real breath of fresh air in a Europe that is shriveling up in upon itself, wrought up in xenophobic debates and increasingly rejecting difference/alterity.

I hope that such an initiative will be able to take place in France. Before getting into the subject at hand, I would like to introduce myself, as I believe that speech should always be located.

I live in France, I am the daughter of Algerian immigrants. My father was a working class man and my mother was a housewife. I am not speaking as a sociologist, a researcher or a theologian. In other words, I am no expert. I am an activist and I am speaking as a result of my experience as a political activist and, I might add, my own personal sensibility. I am insisting on these details because I would like to be as honest as possible in my reasoning. Truth be told, until today, I hadn’t really thought about the question of Islamic feminism. So why am I taking part in this colloquium? When I was invited, I made it quite clear that I lacked the authority to speak about Islamic feminism and that I would rather deal with the idea of decolonial feminism and the ways in which, I believe, it should be related to the more general question of Islamic feminism. That is why I thought I would lay out a few questions that could prove useful for our collective questioning. Continue reading

Classmates II. Still missing: The Political Prisoners

CLASSMATES II.

 Still missing:

THE POLITICAL PRISONERS.

June 2013. [Posted on Enlace Zapatista]

To the adherents of the Sixth in Mexico and in the World:

To the students of the Little Zapatista School:

Compañeras, compañeros, compañeroas:

In addition to the fallen and the disappeared in the struggle, who won’t be present but will indeed be accompanying us in the Little Zapatistas School, are the political prisoners who, under various juridical ruses, are held in the prisons of the world or in political exile.

There are thousands of them throughout the world, and our small word won’t reach all of them. Even as we are relying on our compañer@s in the National Network Against Repression and for Solidarity to try to reach as many as possible, there will always be some we don’t get to.

That is why we are sending this invitation, among many others, to some of the political prisoners who symbolize not only the absurdity of trying to lock up freedom, but also, and above all, the dignified resistance and perseverance of those who are not defeated by guards, walls, and bars.

Continue reading